what’s the point anyway?

what’s the point anyway?

I would like to think that it’s natural to often wonder what the point of a healthy lifestyle is. Our modern culture is quite confusing: we emphasize feasting on junk food but at the same time impose a certain body standard, both expectations unrealistic and definitely not a one-size-fits-all.

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Indeed, I know several friends who were blessed with a fast metabolism, I’m sure we all have a couple of those friends: they seem to eat everything and anything in obscene amounts yet stay slim. And then there are a few of us who seem to gain weight by simply drinking (of course, an exaggeration but you know what I’m trying to say).

To be honest, my passion for health is skewed, or at least started skewed. Middle school Stephanie wanted to eat healthy and exercise consistently for the sake of looking better. It was a vain attempt that unfortunately worked, but it was short-lived. I learned that you need a deeper and more meaningful reason. And I’m not going to lie, finding that deeper meaning is hard; I haven’t even found it yet.

Often times I found myself ditching healthy eating because I would be one of those friends: they would be feasting on junk foods while maintaining a slim figure, and me putting the two and two together, decided that it would be perfectly fine for me to eat those junk foods too. Same goes with exercise: if that friend doesn’t exercise, then I don’t either.

The reason to why we should live a healthier life is more complex than simply looking better. I’m still figuring out this myself, but my answer so far is how we feel.

After eating rich pizza and greasy fries, my body feels sluggish. But I do realize that after eating a fresh salad, my body feels energized and light. (I apologize for the horrible descriptions, this is not my forte) Or even better yet, after an indulgent lunch that mid-afternoon crash where you have low-energy and brain is unclear. I think ultimately, we live a healthy lifestyle to not look good but to feel good.  This sounds like a cliche, I know, but in 2018, to do something simply for an inner result is exceedingly hard. We in this modern world are impatiently wanting a tangible result, something we can see. So this effort to feel great seems foreign and thus makes it much harder to have this as your reason.

It’s definitely a work in progress for me. But at least the awareness counts!

xoxo,

Stephanie

 

Essentials for a Great Workout Routine

Essentials for a Great Workout Routine

It’s finally spring weather! After a super cold and dreary winter season, it’s so nice to sit on the porch with the sun shining and wind billowing. And of course, spring means that there is absolutely NO excuse to exercise! As much as I love working out and breaking a sweat, it’s definitely hard in the winter with the weather and just the ole winter blues.

With spring season and summer right around the corner, I wanted to share a few of my essentials for a killer workout routine.

1) Aaptiv

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Aaptiv is one of my newest discoveries, but quickly becoming my favorite and most crucial to have an amazing workout session. Warning: this is not a regular fitness app. The app provides motivation and guidance right from your headphones. For instance, when I do a treadmill workout, throughout the whole run, the trainers (one of my favorites being Rochelle) are continually motivating and cheering you on. The trainers are all super inspiring and their pumped-up voices are literally what makes me go that extra mile or push harder. Rather than my voice telling me that I should stop, go slower, or take a break, Rochelle’s voice shatters those doubtful thoughts. For those who are lacking in the motivation department, especially when you’re in the midst of the workout, give Aaptiv a try! (They provide a free 7-day trial. I’m sure you’ll be hooked on it after the 7 days, haha). If you check out their website and scroll down, you can hear a sample workout.

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^ Go to the website link and find this button to hear a sample workout!

2) Hydroflask Waterbottle

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I have this one in purple and LOOOVE it

Now, this isn’t just any water bottle. It has to be a Hydroflask. Oh my goodness, I can’t express how much I love my Hydroflask. On those hot and boiling days, opening my Hydroflask and sipping on ice-cold water is THE BEST FEELING. Even if I filled it up in the morning, my water stays cold even when I finish a workout late at night. (I believe that it insulates cold water for 24-hours and hot water for 12-hours). I highly recommend investing in a great insulating water bottle – it will change the way you drink water. (I’ve seen other popular insulating water bottles like S’well)

 

3) Scheduling

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Any bullet journal fanatics around here?

Out of all the essentials here, I believe that number three is the most important. Scheduling and carving out time to workout is key. For me especially, I am a busy-bee and have a million and one things to do in the weekday (and weekend sadly). So unless I schedule and write down that I’m going to workout, chances are, I’m not. And the workouts don’t have to be long at all. Even 20 minutes each day will make you feel much more energized and fit! In the app I was talking about previously, there is a filter where you can filter workouts depending on their duration, a feature I love and use a lot. If I only time to squeeze in a short workout I filter the time to 20 minutes and I can pick and choose which workouts I want to do within the 20 minutes. If I have more time, I would choose like a 45-min or even an hour long piece. TIP: Make sure that when you schedule your workout session, you create buffer time before and after the session. Usually I have a 5-min buffer before and a 10-min buffer after so that I have time to change, head to the gym, and take a break if needed.

 

4) Be realistic

Don’t overdo yourself. Make sure that your workout routine is sustainable. There are very low chances that you will continue a workout session if every time it is miserable and you hate it. In fact, for around 3 weeks, I’ve been routinely walking 10,000 steps daily. And while it took some modifications to get to that quota, the changes weren’t so drastic that I’ve been able to do it everyday. Making manageable changes are key to continue your workout session. In addition to manageable changes, it’s important to make sure you’re enjoying the workout. For me, I love running, taking long walks, golfing, or doing yoga, so I get to be happy while I’m burning calories – a win-win! I think Aaptiv does a great job with this (have I mentioned how much I love Aaptiv?!). The trainers are super motivating and after the end of each workout, I feel so rejuvenated and energized. The trainers at Aaptiv are what allows me to come back to the app each time for another workout.

 

What are your workout essentials?

xoxo,

Stephanie

 

Winter Workout Plan

Winter Workout Plan

I originally wrote this post for the health and nutrition club I do at school. But I decided that the post could work for the blog as well. So after a few revisions and edits (as some points were only pertinent to my school), here is my suggested winter workout plan. They can all be done at the gym – so it really goes well with my post the other day about how to stay active during the winter!

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In the winter, it’s easy to make excuses to not workout, especially when you have no coach, personal trainer, gym program, or workout buddy. However, adhering to a plan helps us mentally stick to the plan. So hopefully this plan will help you become/stay fit or help you keep up with your New Resolution to be more active!

My tip is to start off slow and easy and then build off. Start with one day and then two and then three. I have two plans to share with you all – one for those who are moderate exercisers and one for those who are dedicated and committed to working out.

Moderate exercisers | This plan’s full goal is to be able to workout three times outside of house, each workout an hour long.

    • Workout THREE DAYS a week — ideally, you don’t want them to be three in a row that you  don’t do anything for four days. Schedule your workouts so that your rest period is no more than two days.
    • There is no “perfect” workout, but ideally you want to work your whole body. Whether that’s by doing a full workout every day or by targeting a different body area each day, that’s up to you.
    • For both of these workouts, work up from doing one day and then build up from there.

   If you want a full workout every day…

  • The formula is: cardio + strength training = full body workout
  • Cardio: 30 minutes In terms of cardio, running is the simplest and easiest choice. You can either run outside on campus or run on the treadmill in the gym. Or you can bike, go on the elliptical, or even go on a power walk.
      • If you want to do a full workout every day…

 

  • Strength Training: 20 minutes | For strength training (upper body + lower body). So think about either body weight (push ups, body weight squats, crunches, burpees) or with weights. Tell me in the comments if you want me to share some strength training exercises if you are lost for what to do. 

 

  • Stretch: 10 minutes | Stretching truly is important, especially after a workout. Stretching keeps your muscles flexible, strong, and healthy.

 

 

If you want to do a targeted workout every day …

  • The formula is: cardio + strength training on one specific body part = targeted workout
  • Cardio: 30 minutes | In terms of cardio, running is the simplest and easiest choice. You can either run outside on campus or run on the treadmill in the gym. Or you can bike, go on the elliptical, or even go on a power walk.

 

  • Strength Training: 20 minutes | You’ve heard of “leg day,” “arm day.” For 20 minutes, just do workouts that target one body part. 

 

  • Stretch: 10 minutes | Stretching truly is important, especially after a workout. Stretching keeps your muscles flexible, strong, and healthy.

 

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Intense exercise  | This plan’s full goal is to be able to workout 4-6 times outside of house, each workout an hour long.

  • WORKOUT 4-6 days a week | For this plan, start with four days and then work yourself up to 6. Remember, this is all about maintaining a sustainable lifestyle. If you can’t workout for 6 days. Then no biggie. It’s all about consistency so if you can workout 5 days a week consistently, then that’s great. And remember, life is life, so sometimes with events popping up, you may not be able to workout as much as you would have liked for one week. And that’s completely fine.
  • The workout is the same as the one for the moderate exercise section. The intense aspect is that you are doing it more frequently

 

Hopefully this post will help you be active during the winter months and beyond! Let’s make 2017 the fittest and healthiest year yet!

What’s your favorite workout?

xoxo,

Stephanie

 

Relax & Refresh

Relax & Refresh

Sometimes, you just need a couple hours to yourself. School or work might have been overwhelming, you might have issues occurring in your relationships, or maybe you just had a grueling week and want to reward yourself. Regardless, in my experience, relaxing and refreshing can be very effective in productivity and feeling a sense of well being. Here are some of the things that I have done in the past to pamper myself!

1.) Hike or take a walk in nature. Even sitting in nature and taking it all in clears my head and makes me feel better.

Views from an awesome hike
Acai Pomegranate Bubble tea

2.) Go out to eat. Yes, sometimes food can be a wonderful reward! This past weekend, I went to a restaurant called Asian Bistro to have delicious hot stone bibimbap, and then I also had lunch at a Japanese restaurant where I had avocado sushi. For snack, I got myself a raisin croissant and an acai pomegranate bubble tea. Everything was so delicious and I felt so happy afterwards!

Vegetarian bibimbap

3.) Go on a run. I’m not a big runner (especially compared to Stephanie), but running helps me “run off my stresses” and “run away from my problems”!

Views from a recent run
Custard pudding- almondy and delicious!

4.) Cook and try out a new recipe. My friend and I made egg custards together, and we had an amazing time bonding and cooking. Even if you’re cooking by yourself (as I often am), cooking is a great way to relax. Seeing and eating the final product gives me an amazing feeling. See my first ever blog post on Why I Love to Cook 🙂

5.) Hang out with your family and/or friends. Whether it’s playing board games together, watching a movie, walking around town, or just talking, being with other people makes me feel happier.

6.) Take a long shower, put on a face mask, and listen to music. Your skin will thank you and you’ll feel super refreshed!

7.) Take a half-day trip by visiting a farm, going to the city (if there’s a city near you), visiting a museum, going to a flea market, or something else.

Farm trip
KALE Heaven

8.) Try something thrilling-like white-water kayaking, or rock climbing 🙂

9.) Take a nap-cause sleep is amazing and I can never get enough of it!

Now that I’ve shared my tips, I hope you feel super inspired.

In the words of my mom: “Work hard, play hard!”

Love,

Serena

It’s All in Your Head | The Power Of Your Mindset

It’s All in Your Head | The Power Of Your Mindset

The key behind each successful person is their motivation.

Your mind is such a powerful tool. The power of how you think truly shapes how you view your day and ultimately how you live your life.

As I’m in high school, I’m pretty much forced to do sports. So I chose to do cross country as I love running. But as any runner, swimmer, or athlete will tell you, there is always a love/hate relationship going on in there.

Yes, I love running, but at the same time, I dread it and lose hope – especially during workout days and minutes before the race.

However, I think it’s important to note that IT’S ALL IN YOUR HEAD

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This is seriously and truly is so true. For example, just this past week when I had a 5K race on Saturday, during my warm-up run, I was already out of breath. I have been slightly injured early throughout the season so I was physically just not ready. But you know what? Throughout the whole run, I kept on saying “You can do it.” “You can do it.” “You can do it.” And the result? Got a PR.

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A few days later on Tuesday was another 5K race. My quads were sore from the meet on Saturday and throughout this week and last week, I’ve only been getting 6 hours max of sleep each night. But instead of being negative, I kept on saying “You can do it.” Along with “Be light, relaxed, and fast.” And again, I got an amazing time.

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Last but not least, just a few days ago this Friday, our workout was mile repeats. For some reason my non-cross country friends were having trouble comprehending what this meant. This means I run one mile and then repeat that for several times.

That Friday was just not a good day for me. I’ve been having less than 6 hours of sleep that week, my lunch was a slice of pizza (And even having that one slice was not good — you don’t how much I would have wanted a salad and sandwich), I had a speech competition for English that day, the day was raining, and just so many things have piled up that day and the last thing I wanted to do was run, let alone do a workout.

But … I pushed myself, forced myself to think positive. Throughout the three mile repeats, all I was thinking “You can do it.” “You’re almost there.”

 

So remember … you can do it. You can do it. You can do it. It’s all in your head. Keep that in mind as you power through this Monday and the rest of the week.

What’s your mantra?

xoxo,

Stephanie

 

Fitness Motivation

Fitness Motivation

How is everybody going along with their summer fitness plan?

Personally, I have to say that fitting in my runs have been quite difficult. I have had debate camp from 9am to 6pm every single day (including Saturday and Sunday) and now I’m starting an MUN camp from 9am to 5pm for a week.

And then these camps require homework and I also have a two hour math tutor lesson thing every Tuesday and Friday, so yeah, my schedule has only allowed me to run at 6:40 in the morning.

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It’s really hard waking up every morning when my alarm rings at 6:30 and I know that technically, I can sleep in till 8am without being late to my camps. However, I’ve been hammering myself with motivation and encouragement that it’s been much easier to wake up at 6:30 and just do it.

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So here are some of my tips and tricks:

For those who are training for the fall sports season | I definitely fall in this category. I’m currently training for cross-country, hence a lot of running (I’ve been running around 23 miles/week for three weeks).

Motivation for this category is relatively simple. You have to work hard now, so that you don’t fall behind others when you go to preseason or when you start your season.

I think people can agree with a resounding consensus, that it sucks to feel the “slow” or the “uncoordinated” player of the team. Now in XC, I’m going to be the slowest runner, that’s a fact. The girls on my XC team are the same girls that were with me on the winter track team last year and I know for a fact that I am the slowest. However, my motivation is rooted in the fact that I don’t want to be too slow. Yes, I will be slow, but I don’t want to be incredibly slow. Does that make sense?

So whether you’re the worst, best, or in-between of the team, you want to work hard because eventually it’s going to pay off.

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For those who are doing it for health or weight loss | Just start slow. No need to get stellar split times and you don’t have to exercise for a certain time or goal. Thus, I recommend just getting your butt of that bed, change into your exercise clothes, and just walk. Yep, that’s it. WALK.

Every summer I visit Korea; I realize again the profound benefit of walking. The majority of people in Korea walk. With the benefits of technology, I was able to track my steps whilst in Korea and my daily average was 12,000 steps. And let me tell you, those 12,000 steps do go somewhere.

And this doesn’t just apply to Korea, but in other countries like Italy. When my friends and I visited Italy during spring break of our eighth grade year, we were perplexed at how Italians could eat such carby and rich stuff, yet remain so slim. But it’s the walking I’m telling ya.

So even a short 20-30 minute walk will provide so much useful to you. You don’t even have to powerwalk (although that’ll be nice). Just start walking.

The point is, for people in this category, it’s not so much the quality of your exercise, but more about the quantity of your exercise. To be healthy or to lose weight, it’s important to exercise often and the exercise well part comes later.

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In general | Sometimes, to be honest, these advices doesn’t work. But sometimes, the most brutally simple works the best.

As Nike says best, “JUST DO IT.” My personal advice with this is to just repeat this slogan in your head over and over again.

Also, just keep positive and happy. Stop complaining and just do it. It’s for your own benefit. This hard work and toil that you’re doing, 100% of the result goes to you and no one else.

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On a side note, here’s a couple of interesting tidbits happening so far.

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My mom surprised me when she got this organic kale power while we were in Korea. Ever since coming back from Korea, she’s been making me a goguma smoothie with a tablespoon of this powder. Can’t even taste it!

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I’ve seriously don’t have enough time that I’ve been eating my salad dinners on the go. (I guess Serena have telepathy – both using chicken salad for meals this week!)

 

What motivation do you use to workout?

xoxo,

Stephanie

 

Finding Your Workout: My Exercise Journey

Finding Your Workout: My Exercise Journey

I used to hate working out. Eating healthy was enough for me, and I didn’t realize the benefits of exercise until I actually tried it out. I loved gym class at school because of the team sports and the camaraderie, however, when it came the summer, I wouldn’t actually do much to maintain my fitness.

Every summer, I competed in golf tournaments about once a week and I practiced most days for about 2-6 hour. Really the only physical benefit of golf was that it strengthened my legs and kept my heart rate up because of the amount of walking (typically 5 miles) and swinging involved. However, I wasn’t doing much else to strengthen my body. So when my mom joined a gym membership, I decided to come with her to a yoga class. I instantly fell in love with yoga because it was so peaceful yet physically demanding, and the shavasana (lying down) at the end felt amazing. So I continued to attend the yoga classes once a week and carried this out during my school year. But obviously, one hour of yoga a week was not enough.

I started doing Blogilates (pilates) about once a week and doing push ups before going to bed. The next summer, I joined a field hockey camp that met twice a week, and I sprinted my way across the field. When high school started, I involved myself with field hockey. The team met every week day for two hours each. The amount of cardio we had to do was challenging for me. I remember thinking that the  3 mile run around school was a very big deal.

In the winter, I tried out dance, which met three times a week for one and a half hours each. Dance was completely different from field hockey; there wasn’t much cardio involved, but it was more like yoga because of the flexibility involved. During the season, I realized that I it really was not the sport for me. I wasn’t the most graceful or coordinated, so I told myself I would try a different sport the next winter season.

Spring was golf season for me, which was very exciting. I didn’t do much to supplement my exercise other than the mandatory half-hour weight-lifting once a week.

When summer rolled around, I started thinking back to the winter season and decided that I would either joint the swim team or run distance. Ultimately, I decided to run, mainly because of the support that Stephanie (yes, the other half of this blog), who ran cross country, gave me. I started running for 40 minutes, 5 days a week , and I got used to it. Although I dreaded the early morning wake-ups, I felt so accomplished after each run. I knew that I wasn’t the fastest, or even close to fast, but it gave me pride to be pushing myself into a sport that I was hesitant about because of the immense challenge that it presented for me.

So over the course of my journey so far, I’ve learned a couple things:

1.) Try it even if you think you’ll suck at it! Field hockey and running were two sports that I was completely intimidated by because I hated cardio. But when I gave it a try and gave it some time, I ended up enjoying it.

2.) Constantly push yourself. Fear of the greatness of your potential is probably what’s holding you back.

3.) You need a buddy/buddies. If exercise is hard for you, use other people to motivate you, whether that be teammates, friends, or opponents.

What are your experiences with exercise/athletics?

Love,

Serena

Summer Health & Fitness Goal

Summer Health & Fitness Goal

For a lot of girls, summer = bikini body. However, for me this “bikini body” thing does not appeal to me. I would always choose feeling energized, vibrant, and robust while not having the “cover-girl” body over feeling weak and tired and being sickly thin.

I’m not saying I don’t like looking great, but, if I could only choose one thing, I would rather feel great inside than look great.

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image source

With that being said, my summer health/fitness goals are:

 

  • Get rid of the skinny mentality and replace with strong and fit mentality. | This means less cardio and more weight/strength training = >  weight/strength training two times a week + cardio three times a week

 

    • Last summer, I would do 40 minutes of running in the morning, three hours of tennis and some yoga. In other words, cardio and stretching but no strength training whatsoever. I did get my desired “thinness” but I constantly felt weak and tired.
    • This goal is also influenced by Serena – we were talking once, before spring break, of how we get intimidated by lifting weights because 1) we think it’ll bulk us up (which I learned it doesn’t) and 2) we’re scared to lift weights when they’re these buff guys lifting 100 pound dumbbells on one arm each, next to us.
  • Intuitive eating | This is an extension off of my previous post, but intuitive eating is just the same as anything: easier said than done.
    • Serena has been a real trooper about keeping me in check about this. When we’re eating dinner and I say, “Ugh, I’m not even hungry, but I want some yogurt.” She turns to me and says, “Remember, intuitive eating!” It’s such a simple reminder, yet so effective. (I encourage you guys to tell your health/fitness goals to someone you trust or spend a lot of time with so they can remind you from time to time.)

 

As you can see, my summer goal is not for me to reach a certain number on a scale or for me to fit into a certain article of clothing or certain clothing size, but about how I feel and how I perform.

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From my experience last summer where I lost 20 pounds from tracking and restricting my calories to a mere 1200 when I ran two miles every morning and did 3 hours of tennis daily, I was just not happy. When I went to visit Korea, aka Food Haven, I restricted myself so much, that every day was a struggle and an emotional roller coaster. I learned from summer 2015, that life is meant to be enjoyed and that while, yes, it’s important to be healthy, emotional health is as important if not more important than my physical health. For me, if my emotional health is poor then my physical health becomes even poorer.

 

So for all of those girls and guys out there who want to have the “summer bod,” I URGE you to rethink. Having a summer health/fitness goal is great, but make sure that this goal is not about your physical appearance but more about your emotional wellbeing.

 

What are you hoping to accomplish this summer?

 

xoxo,

Stephanie

Hiking: My Go-To Snacks

Hiking: My Go-To Snacks

A couple days ago, my entire grade went on a hiking trip at a state park. It was a fun experience, but I just wish we had more time to hike!

Anyways, I packed a couple snacks based on my prior hiking trips with my family, and here are my favorites and some tips.

  1. Trail Mix: DIY or a healthy store bought one (no M&Ms though 🙂 ) I packed a store bought one that had pecans, cranberries, yogurt balls, peanuts, and I added raw almonds and cashews
  2. Fruit: Apples, peaches, pears, anything that does not have to be peeled (eg. not kiwi or mango). Also, don’t pack bananas unless you will be eating them right away! My banana smushed in my bag and produced a terrible smell. I had to carry it down the mountain and on the bus ride back to school due to no trash cans!
  3. Dried Fruit (Mango, Banana, Apple, etc.) are perfect for snacking. They can be put in the trail mix as well.
  4. Energy Bars: KIND bars, Clif bars, Luna bars, etc.
  5. Sandwich: a boring spinach, tomato, & cheese. Spice it up with mashed avocado!
  6. Crackers if you’re into the savory like me! Just don’t binge-eat them 🙂 )

I hope this will inspire you to experience the great outdoors and not compromise your nutrition! Here are some of my favorite pics from a family hiking trip in Washington & Oregon from last summer.

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Mt. Rainier
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Multonomah Falls

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What are your go-to food tips for hiking?

Love,

Serena

My Health Journey

My Health Journey

Why do you eat what you eat? What shaped your food choices?

These were questions that I recently asked myself, and I figured that I could bring you on a trip down memory lane with me.

I was raised to eat conveniently, as healthy as fast food could be. About once every two weeks, I remember going to McDonalds with my parents, and they would always order a 6 piece Chicken McNuggets for me, with chocolate milk and apple slices.

On school nights, a typical “Chinese” dinner would include bone broth (made by my dad every Sunday for the rest of the week), white rice, meat (steamed fish or baked chicken) and sautéed veggies. Alternatively, we might have an “Italian” dinner with spaghetti with meat sauce, carrots, and peas. On weekends, my dad would cook an “American” meal, starting with the daily bone broth, and complete with mashed potatoes, ribs, and corn. We would always end meals with dessert–fresh fruit. My parents, both working, raised me on food that they felt was balanced and healthy, and that took half an hour to prepare.

However, I would always crave “healthy” snacks like sweet potato chips, string cheese, purple corn tortilla chips with guacamole, or greek yogurt. After school, I would gorge myself with these snacks, sometimes eating half a bag of veggie chips, or five cheese sticks. It was an unhealthy obsessions that would occur Monday through Friday as my self “reward” for a tiring day at school.

My mom, discovering that the family size chip bags she bought were finished in a couple days, realized that my excessive snacking was unhealthy. She encouraged me to control my portions, but I did little to change this.

Meanwhile, I was always the “healthy girl” among my friends at school, because of my sandwiches and salads for lunch, and my obsession with organics. Looking back, I realize that I was a hypocrite! While I seemed to be a healthy eater, I covered up the fact that I was binge-eating snacks, and my portion control was atrocious. My excuse was that-at least the snacks were “healthy”-they weren’t fried potato chips or brownies.

During the summer between middle school and high school, I became a full-fledged pescetarian, due to the horrors of animal slaughter that I had learned about through documentaries, Youtube videos, and research on PETA.

Admittedly, I did not change my obsessive snack habit until high school, when I would eat all my meals at school, and not have access to the bounty of snacks I had at home. Instead, after school, I would eat one KIND bar, and/or a handful or crackers. Only when the snacks were out of sight did I put them out of my mind.

At the beginning of high school, I also met my now-best friend (and other half of this blog!) Stephanie. She was “the healthy girl”, instead of me, and I could not compete with her. I couldn’t understand how she found salads -without avocados-appealing. Later, her influence rubbed off on me, and I began eating more and more salads. Now, I have noticed that I don’t binge eat on snacks as often, and I am used to eating more raw foods in meals.

What I have learned from my health journey is this:

  1. Out of sight, out of mind–if the unhealthy food is inconvenient to obtain, you will be less likely to consume them
  2. Just because other people are eating it, doesn’t mean that you have to–learn to resist!
  3. Find someone/something to motivate you–support from a friend helps a lot!

Hopefully, my journey is inspirational or relatable to you. Share your thoughts in the comments!

Love,

Serena