My Apple Watch is making me fall back in love with running again…

My Apple Watch is making me fall back in love with running again…

For anyone who’s known me since ninth grade, you know that running and I have a love and hate relationship.

I entered high school vowing to never do track. I ran track in middle school — specifically the 800m which for those who are not familiar with track, you have to run at the speed of a sprint but at a significant distance.

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I think this might have been one of my last long run before I took a hiatus. One of my favorite trails – right along the canal.

The only reason I ran track in middle school was because my hand-eye coordination is extremely poor. I’ve done my fair share of ball sports — my P.E. teacher always shouted to me, “keep your eyes on the ball,” and I have, it’s just that I innately can’t hit it. LOL

Anywho, I entered a new high school telling myself running is a no-no. However, when winter term came, I found myself in the distance winter track team. I don’t even know how that happened. I just looked through the Avolicious archives and found my winter break running routine. I sound insane – I don’t even know how I did that.

But long story short, I fell in love with running during freshmen and sophomore year. I loved the team, I loved the energy and support, but I loved the personal growth and strength you developed from running the most. However, because of my weak knees, I had a slew of injuries to the point that this year I’m not running.

One of the highlights of my weekend during high school was going on long runs with Serena. Whether it was to a park or to a canal (which we went this summer!!), catching up over the 7 miles was incredibly fun and refreshing. But with weak knees making me run less, I lost my stamina and strength and just fell out of running.

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Last XC race 😦

So for the past year or so, I stayed away from running. And the more I stayed away, the more I didn’t want to go back. But that changed with my Apple watch…

I received my Apple watch as a present sometime this spring. I’ve always been a watch enthusiast — Serena can attest to this. But the watches I used to wear were the regular analog leather watches. So getting this huge digital watch was definitely a transition.

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Please excuse the hand…but here’s the activity app. Everything is currently at zero because this was taken past midnight so the next day 🙂 You can see the Move, Stand and Exercise rings. You can customize these goals to be higher or lower than the default.

 

Of all the features of the Apple watch, my favorite has to be the Activity app and the Workout app. The Activity app has three “rings” it measures: move, stand and exercise. Move is essentially the calories you’ve burned, exercise is the amount of time your heart rate has risen, and stand is the amount of time you’ve stood up throughout the day.

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again, sorry for the grainy pic 😦

The Workout app is kind of like the Activity one in the sense that it tracks your movement, but for a specific activity. So I usually set mine to outdoor run or indoor run and it tracks your BPM, mileage and pace which is super neat. I can’t wait for my AirPods to come in the mail so I can leave my phone at home and listen to music from my Apple watch!

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What the rings look like stacked up on your iPhone app

For some one who’s competitive and extremely Type-A, I find it incredibly fun to close all my rings. The Apple watch does a cool animation of the ring closing with a ding sound. It’s a small sign, but it for some reason, does make my day.

So although I’m not fully back into my runner’s high, I can confidently say that my Apple watch has helped me find the joy and fun in running.

And frankly, you don’t even have to invest in an Apple watch to get this feeling. If you didn’t know, your iPhone actually automatically tracks your steps. If you go on the Health app, it shows your steps and distance walked. And you can also download the Nike running app which is great for running. But I think the Apple watch is a great investment as it makes tracking your runs and standard daily activity so much easier. I love the stand feature as it reminds during my long study sessions to take a break and give my legs a stretch.

This is definitely one of my longer posts, but the length just goes to show how much I love my Apple watch! If you have any questions about the Apple watch, leave a comment below!

Have you ever fallen back in love with running?

xoxo

Stephanie

 

Ditch the New Years Gym Membership…workout at home instead!

Ditch the New Years Gym Membership…workout at home instead!

Every year, I get surprised as to how close Christmas and New Years is. It seems like just as the Christmas celebrations and dinner parties are over, I have celebrations for New Years right after!

With New Years comes New Year’s Resolutions. There will be a separate post about setting nutrition and fitness resolutions on the blog earlier next week. In the meantime, for those whose New Year’s Resolution is to get a gym membership, hold off.

While my family still has a gym membership, we do not use our gym membership that often. Going to the gym (no matter how close it is), having to look somewhat presentable, and sharing equipment sometimes has it downfalls. I always love fitting in my workout at my house because it’s just so much more convenient. I can wear totally uncoordinated outfits, I can get set up in less than 5 minutes, and there’s no time wasted coming to and from the gym.

Here are a few examples of home workouts to convince you that you can get a solid exercise routine all in the comfort of your house!

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1.Running | I’ve definitely fallen off my runner’s high bandwagon, but I still from time to time return to running because it gets my heart rate up quickly and release endorphins (the “happy” hormone). My go-to method is going outside and running around my neighborhood.

For those who want to run inside without the preying eyes of your neighbors (haha), check out this treadmill guide that was shared to me. It’s one of the most detailed treadmill guides, if not the most detailed guide in general. It divides the guide into best walking, running, training and even most entertainment provided treadmills.

2. YouTube | There’s so many great workout videos that are free on YouTube! I’ve shared a couple on the blog, but some of my favorites are blogilates, Fitness Blender, Ballet Beautiful and PopSugar Fitness. Let me know in the comments below of any other workout channels that you enjoy!

3. 7 minute workout app | I use this app if I’m pressed for time and don’t have time fit in a proper workout in. It’s great because you don’t need any equipment. Just grab your tennis shoes, grab a yoga mat if you want, find an open space in your house and start the workout! This is great for those who are just starting an exercise routine. With anything habitual and lasting, the best way to start is to do it incrementally. You’re going to burn out if you go to the gym for an hour everyday. Start with doing the 7 minute workout two to three times a week and build up from there.

4. Be creative! | For those who really don’t have time to carve out time to workout even at home, try implementing more active things in your daily life. From time to time, I work standing up rather than sitting down all day. I’ll grab my laptop and books and create a small set up on the island in my kitchen. It’s the perfect height for a standing desk. The standing desk is great as well since you can easily squeeze in a few squats or lunges while working. Even when brushing your teeth or when you’re on a call with someone, walk around rather than standing still. Stretch in the morning and in the night. Even the little things will add up overtime, I promise.

So there you have it! Hopefully I’ve convinced some of you that you don’t have to break the bank by signing up for a gym membership this new year.

I hope you all have a fantastic holiday season with your family and friends!

What’s your favorite at home workout?

xoxo,

Stephanie

How small steps (literally) can change your life

How small steps (literally) can change your life

In this fast-paced world of instant access, it’s perfectly normal that we want change fast. Changes such as losing weight, eating healthier, and being more active. Things I talk about here in avolicious a lot.

We’ve all heard the phrase “Take a leap of faith.” Well actually don’t. I was to be honest tempted to title this post as “Don’t take that leap of faith”

Let me explain.

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Just like taking the stairs. One step at a time.

I took a huge leap of faith, a leap that looking back I realize was completely uneducated and made in blindness. That leap was in the faith that I would become skinner. I don’t what got into that eighth-grade self me. Looking through the pictures now, I was perfectly fine! But at that moment, I felt large. I felt big. I felt like I was that “fat friend” amidst my friend group. Nobody pressured me or treated me differently to lose weight. In fact, it was completely my decision.

I can’t completely say that I regret this decision, as this leap let me become so passionate about proper nutrition and fervent on redefining what “healthy” means to me (which you can read here).  However, if I was given the choice and go back in time, I would choose not to go through this arduous journey.

This leap of faith made me restrict myself to consuming a mere 1,200 calories and running an average of 3 miles daily in the scorching sun. Roughly calculating it, I probably lived off of 500-800 calories. In a matter of 3 months, I lost 20 pounds. But most importantly and significantly, I lost my self-esteem and self-confidence which still affects me today.

Yes, that big leap of faith allowed me to get quick results FAST. I was so proud and pleased with my appearance. I was able to fit into those skinny jeans, no problem. I had a thigh gap. I had a flat stomach. I finally looked like those girls on Instagram.

But I was completely miserable. My day was dictated merely on numbers – the number on the scale, the number of calories I ate that MyFitnessPal app told me, the number of miles I ran that day, the number on the size tag of my clothes. These numbers consumed my life and let me tell you, I felt so powerless. I was in such control of my eating, yet I felt so out of control in my life (it’s a hard feeling to describe but I’m sure a lot of those who’ve gone through ED or experiencing one right now can attest to this).

But fast-forward two years now, I am a much better relationship with food now. I don’t necessarily think that I am fully recovered. I still have a long way to go.

But I have made progress.

And through my experience, I can say that I’ve had successful progress when I took small steps.

Small and baby steps.

Give you an example? I’ve been straying away a bit from running these days. I used to love running the past, but these days I dread just thinking of the mileage and the prospect of running. Instead, I’ve been doing so much walking.

I’m a Type A gal so I love keeping track of things. I’ve been recently logging my steps into the Health app on my iPhone. I’ve been average 10,000+ steps daily!

I wake up at 6:30am when the weather is actually bearable and take a 30-40 minute power walk. This gets me to about 4,000 steps. Later in the evening, I take a 60-75 minute walk with my parents after dinner. This second walk allows me to get up to 10,000-12,000 steps.

And the best part? I get to enjoy being active. I sincerely do get excited about the prospect of walking in the morning and after dinner. While yes, walking necessarily may not burn as much calories, I am able to do it more consistently and with a glad heart.

And to be honest, all I’m going for is to develop a sustainable, maintainable, and happy lifestyle. Nothing too extreme – on both sides of the spectrum. Doing things that I enjoy, eating things that I enjoy, and most importantly, enjoying the body that I was born with.

So I challenge you: instead of making your goal to go to the gym for an hour everyday, or go cold turkey tomorrow, pick ONE change and stick with it.

Have you tried taking baby steps?

xoxo,

Stephanie

Do I have to do rigorous exercise to stay fit?

Do I have to do rigorous exercise to stay fit?

Do I have to do rigorous exercise to stay fit?

This is definitely a question, actually more of a belief that I would have held last year.

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Golfing with my dad during the weekend. The sun was out, the sky was clear, perfect weather!

As much as I loved running and the feeling you get after a nice long run, I do have to admit that I did run for the sake of staying fit. My thought process was this: if I run, then that means I’m burning more calories, building up more stamina and endurance, yeah, I’m going to keep on running.

And this mindset would be the driving force despite the pain I felt in my knees, the heaviness in my quads, the limping after my run.

Now this isn’t to say that running is bad, no that’s not it. After taking a break from running and simply “intuitively exercising” I’ve realized that I’ve been extreme in my attitude towards exercise.

I reasoned that if you don’t exercise, namely rigorous exercise (which means lots of sweating, lots of heavy panting, frequent thoughts of “I can’t do this. I want to give up”), then I won’t be fit.

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I’m always up for a walk with my friends or family. Catching up while exercising! Best of both worlds!

However, as I continue to consistently do yoga, walk a lot, and go golfing, I realize that exercise doesn’t have to be necessarily rigorous to make an impact.

It’s just a matter of efficiency. Running, HIIT (High intensity interval training), boxing require a lot of energy but in a short burst of time. Yoga, golf, walking, hiking require much less energy, but during a longer period of time. Now, long distance running has both the energy and the length aspect, which is probably why the bodies of long distance runners is generally referred to as #bodygoals.

However, I think the key to exercise is not about the intensity or about the length, but about how much you enjoy it.

My dad personally hates running (yet he was my buddy runner for all my 5K GOTR races when I was in middle school – thanks dad!!! <3), but he LOOOVES golfing. He claims that he’s not good (I don’t know about that since he’s waaaay better than me lol) but he enjoys the sport so much. Now, there’s no point in him to run since he literally only goes to the gym once or twice a month to run on the treadmill. What good is that? Yeah, even if one mile is nearly 100 calories, what good is it if he only runs 4 miles ONCE a month? Just 400 calories.

But he almost golfing every weekend with his friends. And I mean every weekend. Minus the weekends that he’s visiting me that is. Even during the winter, he would go out with a million of layers and lots of heat packs. He even did a golf outing with his friends for a long weekend where for two days, they played 36 holes each. 18 holes before lunch and 18 holes after lunch. I know, extreme.

But despite the less energy golf requires, my dad does it in such high frequency that in the long run, golf is the exercise that makes him fit. And let me tell you, don’t regard golf lightly. All the times I’ve gone golfing with my dad, walking the full course is a lot of work. I had my phone in my pocket the whole time and after the course, I checked my phone and it was already over 10,000 steps. Think about it! I just walked the recommended number of steps by doing a round of golf! It definitely requires less energy BUT it’s for a prolonged time so it definitely does train you.

Sorry for this long rant – these days, I’ve been getting a lot of “aha!” moments about eating and exercise. And I wanted to spread this “wisdom” I’ve been getting with you all.

What’s your favorite form of exercise?

xoxo,

Stephanie

 

Walkers high?

Walkers high?

Am I making this term up? I don’t know.

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There’s such thing as a runner’s high, and let me tell you, it’s real. Now, I’m not a professional runner, let alone a varsity runner at my school, but I sure did love running winter of 2015 all the way to fall 2016.

As I mentioned in a previous blog post, I’m taking a break from running as I’m just not feeling it (#intuitive exercise).

Anywho, I’ve been walking a lot more in response. Apparently, you’re supposed to walk 10,000 steps a day. Now, in a culture where we sit down to study, sit down to eat, sit down in the car, sit down just everywhere, that’s hard.

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But…getting those steps gets addictive. At least for me as a Type-A, workaholic, and perfectionist. I’ve been going upstairs and downstairs getting my mom’s bag for her, getting my dad’s keys, just to log more steps. I’ve been running in place while I’m brushing my teeth and flossing. I’ve been walking to and fro in the house while I watch YouTube videos or read a book.

It’s kind of insane and silly to watch me like that in the house, but overall, I’ve been able to log in more steps and truth be told, I do feel like I’m getting enough exercise but just spread over time. So call me someone on walkers high, because honestly, I really just might.

Have you had walkers’ high before?

xoxo,

Stephanie

Winter Workout Plan

Winter Workout Plan

I originally wrote this post for the health and nutrition club I do at school. But I decided that the post could work for the blog as well. So after a few revisions and edits (as some points were only pertinent to my school), here is my suggested winter workout plan. They can all be done at the gym – so it really goes well with my post the other day about how to stay active during the winter!

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In the winter, it’s easy to make excuses to not workout, especially when you have no coach, personal trainer, gym program, or workout buddy. However, adhering to a plan helps us mentally stick to the plan. So hopefully this plan will help you become/stay fit or help you keep up with your New Resolution to be more active!

My tip is to start off slow and easy and then build off. Start with one day and then two and then three. I have two plans to share with you all – one for those who are moderate exercisers and one for those who are dedicated and committed to working out.

Moderate exercisers | This plan’s full goal is to be able to workout three times outside of house, each workout an hour long.

    • Workout THREE DAYS a week — ideally, you don’t want them to be three in a row that you  don’t do anything for four days. Schedule your workouts so that your rest period is no more than two days.
    • There is no “perfect” workout, but ideally you want to work your whole body. Whether that’s by doing a full workout every day or by targeting a different body area each day, that’s up to you.
    • For both of these workouts, work up from doing one day and then build up from there.

   If you want a full workout every day…

  • The formula is: cardio + strength training = full body workout
  • Cardio: 30 minutes In terms of cardio, running is the simplest and easiest choice. You can either run outside on campus or run on the treadmill in the gym. Or you can bike, go on the elliptical, or even go on a power walk.
      • If you want to do a full workout every day…

 

  • Strength Training: 20 minutes | For strength training (upper body + lower body). So think about either body weight (push ups, body weight squats, crunches, burpees) or with weights. Tell me in the comments if you want me to share some strength training exercises if you are lost for what to do. 

 

  • Stretch: 10 minutes | Stretching truly is important, especially after a workout. Stretching keeps your muscles flexible, strong, and healthy.

 

 

If you want to do a targeted workout every day …

  • The formula is: cardio + strength training on one specific body part = targeted workout
  • Cardio: 30 minutes | In terms of cardio, running is the simplest and easiest choice. You can either run outside on campus or run on the treadmill in the gym. Or you can bike, go on the elliptical, or even go on a power walk.

 

  • Strength Training: 20 minutes | You’ve heard of “leg day,” “arm day.” For 20 minutes, just do workouts that target one body part. 

 

  • Stretch: 10 minutes | Stretching truly is important, especially after a workout. Stretching keeps your muscles flexible, strong, and healthy.

 

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Intense exercise  | This plan’s full goal is to be able to workout 4-6 times outside of house, each workout an hour long.

  • WORKOUT 4-6 days a week | For this plan, start with four days and then work yourself up to 6. Remember, this is all about maintaining a sustainable lifestyle. If you can’t workout for 6 days. Then no biggie. It’s all about consistency so if you can workout 5 days a week consistently, then that’s great. And remember, life is life, so sometimes with events popping up, you may not be able to workout as much as you would have liked for one week. And that’s completely fine.
  • The workout is the same as the one for the moderate exercise section. The intense aspect is that you are doing it more frequently

 

Hopefully this post will help you be active during the winter months and beyond! Let’s make 2017 the fittest and healthiest year yet!

What’s your favorite workout?

xoxo,

Stephanie

 

And then there was rest…

And then there was rest…

As much as I want to advocate and encourage people to workout and exercise, that comes in moderation, because too much of even exercising can be harmful.  

I describe myself as a Type-A, workaholic, and driven person. Now, while these characteristics may seem positive (that it may seem like I’m bragging), they can really hurt you when you take it too far and sometimes, I wish I was a bit more relaxed.

With cross country preseason coming up in a bit over a week, I’m nervous – as any runner is – for the gruesome workouts, race, and extreme heat, but at the same time, I can’t wait to get back on runners high.

This summer, I’ve been training for cross country (following a plan I’ve shared on the blog before). While this plan looks really regimented and extreme, our cross country coach did tell our team that the most important thing is to just run four to five times a week.

Nevertheless, I was not one to fall short of “expectations” and followed the cross country plan religiously. While June and July recommended for us to run 5 days a week and only until August should we run 6 days a week, I still ran 6 days since June. Why you may ask?

I’m not a fast runner. Even in winter track, while I improved personally, I was always the slowest of the group. This is why I used HATE running when I was on the track team in middle school. As the Type A and perfectionist I am, being last was a disgrace for me. So I loathed track, but I continued to do it because that was the only sport I could do somewhat well – give me any contact sport and I’ll fail.

However, I realized throughout my winter season that running is about PERSONAL improvement and if I improve my times – no matter how slow they are compared to someone else – then I win. Nevertheless, I lost this mindset and started to train with an unhealthy mindset this summer.

It came to be that this past Wednesday (so yesterday), my schedule was PACKED that I didn’t have time to fit in my run. Instead of brushing it off and accepting that I would only be running 5 times that week (which is perfectly normal and probably more than my other teammates are running), I took my rest day on Sunday and used it to workout. So I was running from Monday, August 8th all the way into Tuesday, August 16th.

The worst thing was I was doing this just to log more miles. Our cross country shares a spreadsheet of all the mileage we run – and I wanted to run the most. Silly right?

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Sometimes you just got to hang up your running shoes…as hard as it may be.

So since Monday, August 15th, my legs were feelings VERY VERY VERY sore. Almost to the point that it was hard to walk and when I started to run I was doing a combination of galloping and shuffling. Still, I pushed myself to run 4.2 miles that day and the next day I even did a hill workout. I know, I was crazy, but at that moment, I felt like I was reasonable.

So Wednesday was my “off” day after 10 days of running and I stretched a lot but walking was still hard so when I woke this morning, instead of doing my planned tempo run, I went for an EASY run.

Now while this may seem trivial, making myself NOT to the planned tempo run and instead go on an easy run was a HUGE leap of faith for me. I had to trust my body and what my legs were feeling instead of my Type A mind.

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So I want to remind y’all that while working out and being active is super important, it’s equally or even more important to take rest when you’re BODY tells you to, not when your workout schedule tells you to. After going on that EASY run, my legs were feeling a lot loose but we’ll see how they’ll react tomorrow (maybe I was supposed to take a complete rest day…).

So remember, “Muscles are torn in the gym, fed in the kitchen, and BUILT IN BED.”

 

How do you dictate your rest days?

 

xoxo,

Stephanie

Finding Your Workout: My Exercise Journey

Finding Your Workout: My Exercise Journey

I used to hate working out. Eating healthy was enough for me, and I didn’t realize the benefits of exercise until I actually tried it out. I loved gym class at school because of the team sports and the camaraderie, however, when it came the summer, I wouldn’t actually do much to maintain my fitness.

Every summer, I competed in golf tournaments about once a week and I practiced most days for about 2-6 hour. Really the only physical benefit of golf was that it strengthened my legs and kept my heart rate up because of the amount of walking (typically 5 miles) and swinging involved. However, I wasn’t doing much else to strengthen my body. So when my mom joined a gym membership, I decided to come with her to a yoga class. I instantly fell in love with yoga because it was so peaceful yet physically demanding, and the shavasana (lying down) at the end felt amazing. So I continued to attend the yoga classes once a week and carried this out during my school year. But obviously, one hour of yoga a week was not enough.

I started doing Blogilates (pilates) about once a week and doing push ups before going to bed. The next summer, I joined a field hockey camp that met twice a week, and I sprinted my way across the field. When high school started, I involved myself with field hockey. The team met every week day for two hours each. The amount of cardio we had to do was challenging for me. I remember thinking that the  3 mile run around school was a very big deal.

In the winter, I tried out dance, which met three times a week for one and a half hours each. Dance was completely different from field hockey; there wasn’t much cardio involved, but it was more like yoga because of the flexibility involved. During the season, I realized that I it really was not the sport for me. I wasn’t the most graceful or coordinated, so I told myself I would try a different sport the next winter season.

Spring was golf season for me, which was very exciting. I didn’t do much to supplement my exercise other than the mandatory half-hour weight-lifting once a week.

When summer rolled around, I started thinking back to the winter season and decided that I would either joint the swim team or run distance. Ultimately, I decided to run, mainly because of the support that Stephanie (yes, the other half of this blog), who ran cross country, gave me. I started running for 40 minutes, 5 days a week , and I got used to it. Although I dreaded the early morning wake-ups, I felt so accomplished after each run. I knew that I wasn’t the fastest, or even close to fast, but it gave me pride to be pushing myself into a sport that I was hesitant about because of the immense challenge that it presented for me.

So over the course of my journey so far, I’ve learned a couple things:

1.) Try it even if you think you’ll suck at it! Field hockey and running were two sports that I was completely intimidated by because I hated cardio. But when I gave it a try and gave it some time, I ended up enjoying it.

2.) Constantly push yourself. Fear of the greatness of your potential is probably what’s holding you back.

3.) You need a buddy/buddies. If exercise is hard for you, use other people to motivate you, whether that be teammates, friends, or opponents.

What are your experiences with exercise/athletics?

Love,

Serena

Non-Runners Workout

Non-Runners Workout

In my Avolicious Summer Fitness plan I posted a few days ago, I mentioned that because I am a runner, I don’t really have an all inclusive workout or training plan for everyone. However, I thought it might be a good idea to share the workouts I did since then, just to give you a sense.

Obviously, this isn’t me telling you to follow what I’m doing. Everybody has different circumstances and different skill levels, that one workout will not and should not fit the bill for anyone. My workouts will be heavily geared towards distance runners, but at the same time, I am an “intermediate” runner, so for those hard-core runners out there, this might be too little, while for runners who have just started, this might be too much. I’ll have a separate post for runners next week.

However, for those non-runners out there, don’t worry! This post is dedicated for you guys. I have on the second half of this post my recommendation. Note: the word “recommendation.” I personally haven’t done these workouts in this schedule and order so use your own discretion. Make sure to listen to your body and stop when you need to stop. Around Saturday of last week, my calves hurt whenever I walked, so I took an easier run that day. I’ll mention this again, but whatever you’re doing, if you’re enjoying it and you’re breaking out a sweat, that’s all you need.

For reference, I’m a teenage girl around 5’5’’ who isn’t the skinniest or fattest, but would definitely say I have so more skin than I would like (Freshman 15 anyone???). I did run distance track in the winter, however, after having a hiatus with running due to crew, I’ve been having a bit of struggle on getting back to my usual mile splits. Thus, I’ve been working slowly up to my splits from winter track.

With all that being said, here are the workouts I did from Thursday, June 2nd to Saturday, June 4th. I have no time to workout on Sunday and Monday because I’ll be on a 14 hour flight to Korea. However, I’ll upload a blog post soon about how to travel healthy while still enjoy the trip.

Thursday, June 2nd | 4.5 mile run + 250x jump ropes

Friday, June 3rd | 6 mile run – just a quick note: after this long run, my calves hurt for the rest of the day and throughout Saturday morning. So instead of ignoring that and wanting to run longer, I decided to take it easier on Saturday

Saturday, June 4th | 30 minute run + 10 minute ab workout (same one from the winter)
—–

General Workouts for Non-Runners  (recommendation)| I know that a lot of people have a designated day – i.e. arm day, leg day, back day, butt day – so I’ll lay out the schedule similarly. Again, I haven’t personally done these workouts in this schedule, but have just done the workouts themselves. So if it’s too hard for you to do these workouts in this schedule and order, tailor it to your skill base. REMEMBER: this is just a rough plan.

 

MONDAY AB DAY |

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TUESDAY LEG DAY | choose one of out these; maybe switch it up every week!

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WEDNESDAY ARM DAY |

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THURSDAY CARDIO DAY |

  • 30 minutes of some form of cardio (jump rope, jogging, elliptical, bike)

 

FRIDAY BUTT DAY |

SATURDAY CHOOSE WHATEVER YOU WANT DAY |

  • The only rule: make sure your workout is AT LEAST 30 minutes

 

SUNDAY REST DAY | **hands-up emoji sign

 

Are you up for the challenge? Tell me what you think!

xoxo,

Stephanie